Tag Archives: A Place of Hope

Healing the Scars of Emotional Abuse

Dr. Gregg Jantz founded The Center for Counseling and Health Resources – A Place Of Hope nearly three decades ago. The Center for Counseling and Health Resources helps patients confront eating disorders, depression, and many other conditions. He is the author of Healing the Scars of Emotional Abuse, among other books.

Healing the Scars of Emotional Abuse addresses how easy it can be to overlook the telltale signs of emotional abuse, and how the scars left from emotional assaults can be just as damaging as those left from physical abuse. Because the pain inflicted by emotional abuse cannot be seen, individuals suffering from emotional abuse often remain silent about their hardships and allow their distress to grow over long periods of time. Healing the Scars of Emotional Abuse offers each reader the chance to confront his or her own emotional scars, learn to accept them, and begin a true process of healing.

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Helping Boys Process Emotions

When Dr. Gregg Jantz envisioned The Center for Counseling and Health Resources, he saw it as a place of hope for those in need of healing from eating disorders, addictions, and emotional difficulties. The Center’s inspired approach to whole-person care addresses every aspect of recovery, including emotional, physical, psychological, and spiritual concerns. Through highly personalized treatment plans, The Center for Counseling and Health Resources offers patients and their families insights into the root causes of psychological and emotional distress.

In Raising Boys by Design: What the Bible and Brain Science Reveal About What Your Son Needs to Thrive, Dr. Jantz and his co-author, Michael Jurian, explore the unique challenges boys face in dealing with their emotions. Based in part on his own experiences as a child and as a parent of boys, Dr. Jantz outlines eight methods to work with the emotional design of young males, giving counselors and parents tools to help boys process their emotions without anxiety.

Two of the methods are action-release and crying. While girls often attempt to verbalize their feelings, boys are more likely to respond to strong emotions by physically releasing energy. Recognizing this, parents may help their sons process their emotions by allowing them to storm from a room, so long as they insist on verbal respect. The crying method provides parents with guidelines for offering their sons strong models of male tears, and a safe environment in which to cry without experiencing recrimination.

These methods, and the other tools introduced in Raising Boys by Design: What the Bible and Brain Science Reveal About What Your Son Needs to Thrive, can help boys retain their emotional wellbeing as they move into adolescence and adulthood.